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Festival of Wellbeing | 22 June - 26 June

 

7.00 - 7.45am

University
Sports Centre

Studio Cycling 

Indoor cycling class based on Spinning principles providing an intense cardiovascular workout in a motivating group environment. Be prepared for tough hill sprints and speed intervals that will really push your physical and mental thresholds.

 

7.00 - 7.30am

University 
Sports Centre 

Health Check Ups

Four health checks (Peak Flow, Blood Pressure, Body Fat and Hamstring/Back Flexibility) will be completed in your 20 minute session, which will give you an indication of your current health levels. Great as a starting point before you begin exercising or to gauge your improvement over time if you currently exercise.

Sessions available are:- 7.00 - 7.30am  |  7.30 - 8.00am  |  8.00 - 8.30am  |  8.30 - 9.00am  |  9.00 - 9.30am 

10.00 - 3.00pm

30min sessions 

Institute of Continuing Education
Madingley Hall

Carefree Canines

Back by popular demand, half a dozen delightful dogs will grace the grounds of Madingley Hall and are looking for some friends to play and walk with. There is nothing to make worries disappear quite like stroking a happy dog, playing fetch or simply strolling with your companion in a beautiful setting.

Session times :- 10.00 - 10.30am  |  10.30 - 11.00am  |  11.00 - 11.30am  |  11.30 - 12.00pm  |  1.00 - 1.30pm  |  1.30 - 2.00pm  |  2.00 - 2.30pm  |  2.30 - 3.00pm

12.30 - 1.25pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Legs, Bums and Tums

Shape up and burn fat as you lunge, step and jump your way to fitness in the ever-popular fun class.

The high repetition based routines will put your legs, bottom and stomach through their paces and help improve co-ordination, flexibility and stamina along the way.

12.30 - 1.25pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Rugby / Eton Fives

Rugby Fives is a handball game, similar to squash, played in an enclosed court.  The game is played between two players (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles), the aim being to hit the ball above a 'bar' across the front wall in such a way that the opposition cannot return it before a second bounce. The ball is slightly larger than a golf ball, leather-coated and hard. Players wear leather-padded gloves on both hands, with which they hit the ball.

Eton Fives, is a handball game, similar to Rugby Fives, played as doubles in a three-sided court. Eton Fives was developed in the late 19th century at Eton College. The shape of the court used now is taken from the chapel at Eton College, where A. C. Ainger and some of his friends developed a simple set of rules in 1877. The rules have been modified since that time to those seen now, but the essential components are still the same.  The object is to force the other team to fail to hit the ball 'up' off the front wall, using any variety of wall or ledge combinations as long as the ball is played 'up' before it bounces twice. Players wear leather padded gloves on both hands, with which they hit the ball.

12.30 - 1.30pm

Clinical School - 
Clifford Albutt
Lecture Theatre

How to be an Active Bystander

Have you ever been concerned about a situation and wanted to help, but didn't? Hearing a racist/sexist/homophobic joke in the tea room? Seeing an inappropriate touch of a friend? Watching a colleague wince at being belittled or interrupted in a team meeting? You're not alone, this is more common for many of us than you might think.

Come along to this short session to find out why this happens and what it means to be an active bystander. This includes simple changes and actions you can take to support others around you without confrontation and, over time, support a more inclusive environment for all of us to live and work in.  

12.30pm & 1.30pm

Cambridge Biomedical
Campus

Lunchtime Walk

Join us for free 30-40 minute led walks. No need to book, just turn up. Walks are at a pace to suit everyone. Meet at Reception, near the Addenbrookes Hospital Concourse entrance.

To find out more, contact Richard Butler (walk leader) email: richard.butler@addenbrookes.nhs.uk, tel: 01223 216087

12.45 - 1.30pm 

University Library 

Tower Tours at the University Library

At 157 feet tall Cambridge University Library’s tower is its most recognisable feature, and can be seen for miles around. This tour of the tower, normally accessible only to Library staff, reveals some of the secrets held in its collections. The subject of the UL’s current exhibition, the tower collections (over half a million books on 11 floors) tell the story of two centuries of popular publishing in the UK, received under the Copyright Act and since 1934 held in the tower as ‘secondary’ to the Library’s main academic collections. Victorian toys and games jostle for shelf space with colourful children’s books, Edwardian fiction in pristine dust jackets and popular periodicals.

Now recognised as a treasure trove for researchers, its collections tell the story of our national life through the printed word. The exhibition can be viewed in the Milstein Exhibition Centre before or after your tour. Please note that the lift stops on the 15th floor. Access to the 16th floor is via a single flight of stairs. This tour may not be suitable for those uncomfortable in confined spaces or those with mobility issues.

             18s and over only

             In the event of a fire evacuation or lift failure, access up or down the tower is via 200+ steps. Therefore, this tour is not suitable for those with limited mobility or wheelchair users.

             This tour may not be suitable for those uncomfortable in confined spaces

             Bags and large coats must be left in our Locker Room off the Entrance Hall before the tour commences

             No food or drink may be consumed at any point on the tour

             The tower is a high-security area and the Library reserves the right to search tour visitors on exit

1.05 - 1.50pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Metcon

Bored of your training routine? Then why not try Metabolic Conditioning training! This is a high intensity training class where the routine is changed regularly to keep the body guessing.

4.00 - 5.00pm

Norwich Auditorium 
Roger Needham
Building 

Senior Academic Promotions (SAP) Open Forum

Hosted by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Institutional and International Relations, Professor Eilís Ferran, this session will provide an overview of the University's Senior Academic Promotions (SAP) procedure, highlight the main changes to the process, provide an overview of the SAP CV Scheme and address some common misconceptions.

5.00 - 7.00pm

Judge Business School

 

Cycle Maintenance Workshop

To be held in the Foyer of the Judge Business School. Bring along your bike and learn what can be achieved with a minimalist toolkit and the application of basic bike repair skills. The workshop will include general bike checks (‘M’ Check), reviewing gears, removing and replacing wheels, choosing and applying lubricants, fixing punctures, the contents of a basic tool kit, adjusting brakes and, if time allows, bike cleaning tips, how to replace brake blocks and any bespoke requests you might have.

5.30 - 6.25pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Boxercise®

Boxercise is based on the training concepts boxers use to keep fit. Punching, skipping, ducking and weaving are combined with body weight exercises, burpees, shuttle runs, press ups and more!

6.30 - 7.15pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Squash / Racketball

Squash is a club sport played by two (singles) or four players (doubles) in a four-walled court with a small, hollow rubber ball. The players must alternate in striking the ball with their racket and hit the ball onto the playable surfaces of the four walls of the court. The game was formerly called squash clubs, a reference to the "squashable" soft ball used in the game

Racketball is the UK’s fastest growing sport! It is played on any regular squash court and is similar to squash. In Racketball a larger ball, which does not need warming up like in squash, and a shorter racket are used, as shown below. The fact that the ball is bigger, more bouncy and does not need warming up means that the rallies last longer, as the ball moves slower giving the opponent more time to react and get to the ball. The shorter racket also helps with hand eye coordination making the ball easier to strike. Overall this makes the game much easier to pick up than many other sports like squash or tennis. Racketball is said to be, "Easy to learn yet difficult to master" which is one of the key factors in the sports recent growth.

6.30 - 7.25pm

University 
Sports Centre 

Bodypump

Using light to moderate weights with lots of repetition, BODYPUMP™ gives you a total body workout. Instructors will coach you through the scientifically proven moves and techniques, helping you achieve much more than on your own!